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Dried seafood

Drying food is the world’s oldest known preservation method, and dried food has a storage life of several years. The method is cheap and effective in suitable climates; the work can be done by anyone, and the resulting product is easily transported to market.

Fresh fish rapidly deteriorates unless some way can be found to preserve it. Drying is a method of food preservation that works by removing water from the food, which inhibits the growth of microorganisms. Open air drying using sun and wind has been practiced since ancient times to preserve food. Bacteria, yeasts and molds need the water in the food to grow, and drying effectively prevents them from surviving in the food.

Usually eaten during breakfast, and very popular with the general public, they are best prepared by frying in a pan with a bit of cooking oil, or by toasting over a charcoal grill. Serve with spicy vinegar dip.

In photos are several varieties of dried fish and squid which are main products and readily available in the main markets of most of the seaside towns in the Philippines’ 7,107 islands. Taken by ace photographer Michael Ocampo (https://www.facebook.com/michael.ocampo.75873?fref=ufi) at the Cebu Market. According to Michael, “Cebu City’s Taboan Market can officially be called the Dried Fish Capital of the Philippines. Here you can find many stalls selling a variety of dried fish including squid, octopus, shrimps and eels.”

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Hibi (Dried Shrimps)

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Dried Anchovies

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Dried Squid Flakes/Strips

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Dried Squid

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Dried Fish

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Dried Fish Tocino (Fish bacon)

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Fish bones crispy when fried

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Dried Octopus

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